insideaseaninsideasean about usabout us contact uscontact us site map
Asean & Global Updates
POSTED | 16:29 PM | 30-05-2017

Tobacco kills 7 million a year, says WHO

Smoking and other tobacco use kills more than seven million people each year, the World Health Organization said on Tuesday (May 30, 2017), also warning of the dire environmental impact of tobacco production, distribution and waste, AFP reported.

The UN agency said tougher measures were needed to rein in tobacco use, urging countries to ban smoking in the workplace and indoor public spaces, outlaw marketing of tobacco products and hike cigarette prices.

“Tobacco threatens us all,” WHO chief Margaret Chan said in a statement.

“Tobacco exacerbates poverty, reduces economic productivity, contributes to poor household food choices, and pollutes indoor air,” she said.

In a report released ahead of World No Tobacco Day on Wednesday, WHO warned that the annual death toll of seven million people had jumped from four million at the turn of the century, making tobacco the world’s single biggest cause of preventable death.

And the death toll is expected to keep rising, with WHO bracing for more than one billion deaths this century.
 
“By 2030, more than 80 percent of the deaths will occur in developing countries, which have been increasingly targeted by tobacco companies seeking new markets to circumvent tightening regulation in developed nations.”

Tobacco use also brings an economic cost: WHO estimates that it drains more than $1.4 trillion (1.3 trillion euros) from households and governments each year in healthcare expenditures and lost productivity, or nearly two percent of the global gross domestic product.

In addition to the health and economic costs linked to smoking, the WHO report for the first time delved into the environmental impact of everything from tobacco production to the cigarette butts and other waste produced by smokers.

“From start to finish, the tobacco life cycle is an overwhelmingly polluting and damaging process,” WHO Assistant Director-General Oleg Chestnov said in the report.

The report detailed how growing tobacco often requires large quantities of fertilisers and pesticides, and it warned that tobacco farming had become the main cause of deforestation in several countries.

In This Section
MOST READ
most read
Korean fever strikes Bhutan
Through the Thai royal lenses
Beauty is not skin deep
10 Bollywood celebrities and their crazy obsessions
TRAVEL & LEISURE
China now the biggest source of foreign tourists to Boston
China now the biggest source of foreign tourists to Boston
A record number of Chinese tourists visited Boston last year, dethroning the United Kingdom as the No.1 source of overseas tourists.
 TRAVEL & LEISURE more